• FALSE: Pelosi’s claim the House GOP is ‘inviting’ violent criminals to carry concealed weapons

    The Pinocchio Test

    Pelosi’s tweet focuses on a possible loophole in the law and then uses inflammatory language such as “inviting.”

    But the reality is that most states already allow for reciprocity agreements with other states. Federal law also already prohibits violent criminals, abusers and stalkers from having guns; the issue is that some states already have tougher laws than at the federal level that could be overridden by permits from more lenient states. Still, the differences among most states may loom larger in the gun debate than in reality.

    Pelosi’s tweet inspired such anger because responsible gun owners believe their rights are being curtailed, even if they follow the concealed-carry rules — while violent criminals who want to have a gun are not going to be bothered with following such rules in the first place.

    We wavered between Two and Three Pinocchios but ultimately settled on Three because her last line — “the @HouseGOP just voted to do exactly that” — is so over the top and exaggerated. One can have a respectful political debate, raising the issue of a lower common denominator for concealed-weapons permits, without accusing the other side of voting to let violent criminals and stalkers have guns.

    Three Pinocchios

     

  • An Update On National Reciprocity

    Rep. Richard Hudson, R-N.C., joined NRATV’s Grant Stinchfield Wednesday to give an update on the push for national reciprocity: “We have 129 co-sponsors, including three Democrats. So, I feel like we’re moving along very well with it,” he said.

    Hudson introduced the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 on Congress’ first day in session for 2017. The bill, also known as H.R. 38, would eliminate the disorder of state carry laws by allowing individuals who have a license to carry permit from their resident state to exercise those rights across state lines.

    “We’re using this time to prepare, to build support, and when we get our window of opportunity later this year, we’re going to take it,” assured Hudson.

    Watch the video here…

  • National concealed reciprocity bill picks up 150th co-sponsor in House

    Filed just over a month ago, legislation to treat concealed carry permits like drivers’ licenses nationwide is gaining steam in Congress but picking up opponents.

    Introduced by U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson, R-NC, and 63 co-sponsors on the first day of session in the new House, Indiana Republican Trey Hollingsworth became the 150th lawmaker to lend his name to the measure last week.

    Hudson has taken to the airwaves repeatedly in the last several weeks to stump for his proposal and push back against what he sees as misinformation about his legislation.

    “It’s flat out false to say that this bill will arm criminals or increase gun violence,” wrote Hudson in an op-ed published in U.S. News on Feb. 1. “If a criminal with malice wants to get a gun, I can guarantee he or she isn’t worried about following the laws on the books. Unfortunately, we can’t change that. But we can ensure law-abiding citizens can legally carry concealed firearms to defend themselves.”

  • Rep. Richard Hudson: “We’re Going to Repeal Obamacare”

    “There’s no disagreement among Republicans that we’re going to repeal Obamacare.” Those are the words of Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC 08) in an exclusive appearance on the “What Matters in North Carolina” podcast on January 5, 2016.

    During the interview, Hudson affirmed that the mood among his colleagues is in fact that repealing the monstrosity officially known as the Affordable Care Act is a priority. Hudson continued,

    Of course saying that Obamacare is going to be repealed and replaced is just the starting point, but Hudson said it is a conversation that House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) and President-elect Donald Trump began to have immediately following the election in November.

    There are procedural questions and issues that will have to be navigated in order to undo a law that has been in place for nearly seven years. Hudson said, “Right now it’s a matter of timing and sequence. What you’ll see is a bill move very quickly through the House and Senate to repeal Obamacare, using a budget process called reconciliation. This is a process that allows a vote that can’t be filibustered in the Senate, so 51 votes can pass it.”

    A similar bill was sent to President Obama last year which he vetoed. Hudson said that the Senate will likely start the process with their bill next week, and that a bill could be on President Trump’s desk in February. But, the process is not as cut and dry as it may seem.

    Hudson said that because of Senate rules attached to budget reconciliation bills, a repeal and full replacement of Obamacare cannot be done in the same legislation. Hudson said that there could be some replacement language in the form of expanding Health Savings Accounts.

    However, the tax penalties which have been so onerous to many Americans may be addressed in the repeal bill. Hudson said, “My hope is that you’ll see a zeroing out of those tax penalties.” Additionally, Hudson said that President Trump is set to begin unwinding Obamacare.

    Hudson said, “Vice-President-elect Mike Pence spoke to House Republicans yesterday, [Wednesday, January 4, 2016], and he told us that President Trump is going to start immediately through the executive order process, through the administrative process of replacing Obamacare and doing the things they can do. For example, having an HHS Secretary remove some of the restrictions on insurance companies on plans, some of the requirements they can do administratively, they’ll start that right away, as well.”

    Hudson, who serves on the House Energy Commerce Committee, said that the committee will start hearing before the end of the month on what a replacement to Obamacare will look like. Hudson said that HR 2300, which has been introduced the past three years is the basic blueprint for what replacement will look like.

    Hudson said, “The basic components of it are, Health Savings Accounts, allowing insurance companies to compete across state lines, giving tax credits to individuals who buy insurance, transparency of cost so that you know what things cost before you go have a procedure, tort reform. These are all the things we’ll be doing and they’ll probably start as individual legislation.”

    Pulling the rug out from under a massive law like the Affordable Care Act is ultimately not going to happen, as Hudson noted that the repeal that is likely to be on Trump’s desk in February will be a phased-in two or three-year repeal. Hudson said, “As Mike Pence said yesterday, we need to make sure we have an orderly transition so that we don’t disrupt markets, so that we don’t disrupt families. If there are folks out there that have health care through Obamacare they don’t need to have anxiety that they’re going to lose that coverage.”

    Hudson added, “There will be a time period that we will have to put that new health care reform in place, before Obamacare goes away. But, Obamacare will be eliminated with that legislation that’s going to pass next month.” Ultimately Hudson said that they want to get it right, and have real conservative healthcare reform that will help people.

    Click here to listen to the full interview on “What Matters in North Carolina” with Rep. Richard Hudson, including his thoughts on the bill he filed on National Concealed Carry Reciprocity.

  • Moore Pilot: Richard Hudson for U.S. House

    “I’m comfortable in my own skin,” he says. “I’m not afraid to have a discussion with someone who has a different view.”

    He supports bipartisan legislation related to identifying new jobs needed in the energy sector; putting more money into “21st century cures” for disease research; and reforming mental health. And unlike Ellmers, who only ever advocated repeal of the Affordable Care Act, Hudson at least supports an alternative.

    Hudson over the years has learned that he can maintain certain core values, and yet compromise is not always a bad thing. “I’m willing to vote for a bill that has three things I don’t like,” he says, “if it has four things I do like.”

    We don’t — and won’t — agree on every issue with Hudson, but we believe there’s a better, more sensible nature to him that will serve Moore County well. He’ll ensure that, when a constituent calls his office for help, there won’t be an accompanying voter registration check.

    Richard Hudson will be a solid voice for Moore County in Congress.

  • In District 8, candidates agree on trade, terrorism, not much else

    WASHINGTON
    Republican U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson and his Democratic challenger, Thomas Mills, agree on trade and terrorism, but not on much else in the North Carolina District 8 race.

    The incumbent and his challenger say they value fair trade over free trade. They are both wary about the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, which would broaden trade between the United States and a dozen countries on the Pacific Rim. Both say the pact reminds them of another trade deal, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which they blame for the loss of many Carolinas textile jobs.

    “I do understand that for our employers and for our agriculture, which is our number one industry in North Carolina, we do need foreign markets, and we do need to have trade agreements, but we need to be smart about it,” Hudson said.

    Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article102948667.html#storylink=cpy

  • U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson calls departure of 440th wing ‘short-sighted decision’

    Two-term U.S. Rep. Richard Hudson, who represents the 8th District, calls the departure of the 440th Airlift Wing on Fort Bragg “a short-sighted decision” that has spawned a series of troubling issues.

    The Army long opposed Air Force plans to shut down the 440th, fearing that it could compromise training.

    “The process is done for the 440th now,” Hudson said Thursday during a visit to The Fayetteville Observer newsroom. “The Air Force had to make its decisions based on limited resources.”

    Read more…

  • Richard Hudson rolls over D’Annunzio in the GOP primary

    “Renee and I are incredibly grateful for the hard work and generosity of those who have supported our re-election efforts and those who voted today,” said Hudson. “It’s humbling to know I have such strong support from hundreds of volunteers and thousands of voters who are standing with me and believe in the conservative work I’m doing to empower businesses to create jobs, protect our freedoms, and return control back to individuals and families in our community and away from Washington.”

  • N.C. congressional leaders seek to protect training of Fort Bragg paratroopers

    Members of Congress are moving forward on attempts to protect the training of Fort Bragg paratroopers, even as Air Force leaders say they are on track to increase their support to Fort Bragg when compared with last year.

    Reps. Renee Ellmers and Richard Hudson have filed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act that would create additional congressional oversight when it comes to airborne operations on Fort Bragg, to ensure the Air Force is providing the promised support.

    The House version of that bill already includes a provision aimed at protecting funding for the Global Response Force, which is largely composed of the 82nd Airborne Division, 18th Airborne Corps and other Fort Bragg units.

    The GRF is tasked with deploying on short notice anywhere in the world in support of combat operations or humanitarian relief.

    Read more…

  • U.S. Rep. Hudson to host Service Academy Day Saturday

    May 14 from 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at Concord High School. Eighth district students who are in middle and high school and interested in attending a Service Academy and their parents are encouraged to attend.

    Representatives from the Service Academies as well as cadets/midshipmen, future Academy attendees, parents and Service Academy Selection Committee panel members will be on hand to explain the nomination process and requirements.

    As Representative of North Carolina’s eighth congressional district, Rep. Hudson has the privilege of nominating a limited number of young men and women each year to four of the five service academies: U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Merchant Marine Academy.